The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Gardens, with support from the GCA, has worked to preserve thousands of gardens that these pollinators rely upon. There are some simple steps that can be taken to support pollinators in our own gardens.

There is a saying that for every third bite of food, you should thank a pollinator! Pollinators are a diverse group of insects, birds and mammals who generally consume nectar and in the process spread pollen and fertilize flowers. It is well documented that this is a necessary and vital part of the world’s ecosystem.

The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Gardens, with support from the GCA, has worked to preserve thousands of gardens that these pollinators rely upon to sustain themselves as well as facilitate seed production.

There are some simple steps that can be taken to support pollinators in our own gardens:

Know what to grow

If the goal is to attract a variety of native pollinators, plant a range of native flowering plants that provide food and shelter through many seasons.

Give them a home

Consider leaving leaf litter or dead wood in your garden or installing a bug hotel and bird house.

Avoid chemicals

Pesticides that kill aphids, mosquitoes, rodents or other unwanted garden visitors can also be harmful to your various pollinating guests.